The Weekly Security and DevOps News Brief

A lot happened in the world of security and DevOps this week. Here are top posts we saw:

The business landscape through the lens of cloud infrastructure and security

Saju Sankaran Kutty wrote a piece in Tech2 on the business landscape through the lens of cloud infrastructure and security. While the various cloud options available have presented performance and economic benefits, concerns around security of enterprise data in the cloud, loss of control over resources in the vendor’s cloud, risk of lock-in to cloud platform vendors, application performance in a hybrid cloud environment and guaranteed availability of business processes continue to drive, or hamper, cloud adoption.

Read the full piece here.

Ransomware Can Threaten Small Businesses That Lack Adequate Defenses

According to an article in BizTech by Phil Goldstein, ransomware is now the most significant and problematic cybersecurity threat, and small businesses need to make sure they can defend and respond to attacks. Goldstein wrote that ransomware is now the most problematic cybersecurity threat, even more dangerous than advanced persistent threat network attacks, according to a report from cybersecurity researchers at Kaspersky Lab.

Read the full piece here.

The top three cloud security myths: BUSTED

An article in Business Cloud News (BCN) on cloud security myths shared that many CIOs struggle to identify and implement the cloud services most suitable for their business. According to the piece, research finds over three quarters (79 percent) of CIOs find it a challenge to balance the productivity needs of employees against potential security threats, while 84 percent of CIOs worry cloud causes them to lose control over IT.

Read the full piece here.

Healthcare Suffers Estimated $6.2 Billion In Data Breaches

An article by Kelley Jackson Higgins on data breaches in healthcare published in Dark Reading, stated that nearly 90 percent of all healthcare organizations suffered at least one data breach in the past two years with an average cost of $2.2 million per hack.

Read the full piece here.

What interesting security and DevOps news did you read out there this week? Let us know in the comments.