3 Questions to Ask When You’re Ready to Operationalize Your Security

New global data from Checkmarx reveals that 92 percent of organizations struggle to implement security into DevOps — even though they say they want to. The heart of this issue is the common misconception that security slows things down, which leads to the common practice of skipping security measures in an effort to get things done.

While this approach may seem to create a payoff in terms of productivity, any gains are short term at best and are always offset by the fact that the company is at greater risk for a breach.

But the truth is, speed and security are not mutually exclusive, and you can effectively integrate security into operations throughout your organization if you follow SecOps best practices.

With that in mind, we’ll use this post to walk through the three major questions your organization must ask as it moves toward operationalized security.

Before diving into the post, however, take a look at details on our upcoming webinar — “How to Spend Your Security Budget in a DevOps World.” Read more “3 Questions to Ask When You’re Ready to Operationalize Your Security”

3 SecOps Culture Hacks You Should Embrace Today

All types of organizations are embracing DevOps as a way to deliver work quickly and reliably. However, security sometimes falls by the wayside in favor of the desire to move fast. In fact, a recent Threat Stack survey shows that 52% of companies admit to sacrificing security for speed.

As a result, Security, Development, and Operations teams often remain deeply siloed, causing security to be treated as an afterthought and placing teams in constant “reactive mode” — which exposes the organization to unnecessary risk. Our recent survey of Development, Operations, and Security professionals spells out a few of the key issues:

  • Security is siloed. At 38% of organizations, security is a completely separate team that is only brought in when needed.
  • Developers can’t code securely. 44% of developers aren’t trained to code securely. Without this basic ability, code is often written without security in mind, and this causes security to become a disruptive bottleneck when it must inevitably step in and intervene.
  • Operations doesn’t have security training. 42% of operations staff admit that they are not trained in basic security practices — meaning they can’t configure servers securely, and they do not see deploying securely as part of the configuration management process.

Ultimately, people and processes make up the foundation of every business transformation. SecOps is no different. Change can be difficult, but operationalizing cloud infrastructure security can help you reduce security incidents, ensure compliance, and innovate without sacrificing security or speed.

Below, we’ll walk through three of the cultural changes that need to take place at your organization to encourage people to embrace SecOps as they pursue innovation, speed, and scale. Read more “3 SecOps Culture Hacks You Should Embrace Today”

How to Use Ops Tools for Security and Security Tools for Ops

Investing in SecOps doesn’t just mean hiring folks who know how to blend together software development, IT operations, and security skillsets. It also doesn’t just mean telling your DevOps team to run secure or scolding your security team into moving fast enough to keep up with continuous deployment.

Truly committing to SecOps means investing in tools that can do double (or triple) duty — helping you not only release code continuously but ensure that everything from your back-end infrastructure to your customer-facing applications is 100% secure. It means investing in tools that make meeting both DevOps and security best practices simple and straightforward.

As DevOps expands to include more security functions and security evolves to be more agile, it’s never been more important (or economical) to be able to use operational tools for security and security tools for operations. DevOps teams want software that can integrate critical functions of security, like alerting, directly into their current processes. Security teams want tools that let them seamlessly interact with DevOps.

Here’s what that should look like. Read more “How to Use Ops Tools for Security and Security Tools for Ops”

The 5 Ingredients of a Successful SecOps Implementation

Ask three people what SecOps is and chances are you’ll get three different descriptions:

  1. It’s a team
  2. It’s a job title
  3. It’s a methodology

All of these definitions are, in fact, correct. Smaller companies may implement a SecOps methodology where everyone is a security ambassador, whereas larger companies with more personnel can assemble an entire team and designate specific SecOps job titles.

Our team defines SecOps as “automating runtime security in your infrastructure in a way that aligns security and operations tasks.” The goals are to reduce risk, stabilize infrastructure, and improve operational efficiency.  With operations and security teams dealing with rapidly transforming infrastructure (which likely includes some combination of containers, microservices, or serverless architecture) and a severe resource shortage, it’s tough to know where to begin building a mutually beneficial security program that considers security and operations priorities and goals.

To help get you started, here are five ingredients that must be part of any successful SecOps implementation. Read more “The 5 Ingredients of a Successful SecOps Implementation”

Will SecOps Finally Close the Security and Operations Gap? A Q&A with Pete Cheslock

At Threat Stack, we’ve been a SecOps-oriented team from day one. This means our developers, operations, and security practitioners all work together to make sure that every line of code we release is secure. It’s how we eat our own dogfood.

But we know that getting started with SecOps isn’t always easy, especially since little has been said so far about the practicalities of how security and operations can come together to enable SecOps.

Pete Cheslock, our Senior Director of Operations and Support, has been on the frontlines of SecOps for much of his career, so we decided to spend some time quizzing him about the practical aspects of getting a SecOps program started. Read more “Will SecOps Finally Close the Security and Operations Gap? A Q&A with Pete Cheslock”