3 Questions to Ask When You’re Ready to Operationalize Your Security

New global data from Checkmarx reveals that 92 percent of organizations struggle to implement security into DevOps — even though they say they want to. The heart of this issue is the common misconception that security slows things down, which leads to the common practice of skipping security measures in an effort to get things done.

While this approach may seem to create a payoff in terms of productivity, any gains are short term at best and are always offset by the fact that the company is at greater risk for a breach.

But the truth is, speed and security are not mutually exclusive, and you can effectively integrate security into operations throughout your organization if you follow SecOps best practices.

With that in mind, we’ll use this post to walk through the three major questions your organization must ask as it moves toward operationalized security.

Before diving into the post, however, take a look at details on our upcoming webinar — “How to Spend Your Security Budget in a DevOps World.” Read more “3 Questions to Ask When You’re Ready to Operationalize Your Security”

3 SecOps Culture Hacks You Should Embrace Today

All types of organizations are embracing DevOps as a way to deliver work quickly and reliably. However, security sometimes falls by the wayside in favor of the desire to move fast. In fact, a recent Threat Stack survey shows that 52% of companies admit to sacrificing security for speed.

As a result, Security, Development, and Operations teams often remain deeply siloed, causing security to be treated as an afterthought and placing teams in constant “reactive mode” — which exposes the organization to unnecessary risk. Our recent survey of Development, Operations, and Security professionals spells out a few of the key issues:

  • Security is siloed. At 38% of organizations, security is a completely separate team that is only brought in when needed.
  • Developers can’t code securely. 44% of developers aren’t trained to code securely. Without this basic ability, code is often written without security in mind, and this causes security to become a disruptive bottleneck when it must inevitably step in and intervene.
  • Operations doesn’t have security training. 42% of operations staff admit that they are not trained in basic security practices — meaning they can’t configure servers securely, and they do not see deploying securely as part of the configuration management process.

Ultimately, people and processes make up the foundation of every business transformation. SecOps is no different. Change can be difficult, but operationalizing cloud infrastructure security can help you reduce security incidents, ensure compliance, and innovate without sacrificing security or speed.

Below, we’ll walk through three of the cultural changes that need to take place at your organization to encourage people to embrace SecOps as they pursue innovation, speed, and scale. Read more “3 SecOps Culture Hacks You Should Embrace Today”

5 SecOps Processes to Try Today

DevOps has enabled businesses to bring products to market faster than ever before. But what about security?

In our recent survey, Refocusing Security Operations in the Cloud Era, 36% of businesses said their top IT goal over the next year is to respond to business needs faster. Conversely, only 10.5% prioritized improving security as their top goal.

There is a misconception that businesses can’t move both quickly and securely. But with SecOps best practices, businesses can move away from the ad hoc, reactive tactics that slow things down, and replace them with repeatable processes that effectively support teams and products. Let’s explore. Read more “5 SecOps Processes to Try Today”

New SecOps eBook for Cloud Infrastructure – A Practitioner’s Guide for Security & Ops Teams

— Shifting From DevOps to SecOps —

Organizations of all sizes have embraced DevOps as a way to deliver work quickly and reliably — but security has often fallen by the wayside in the quest for speed. In a recent survey, 85% of respondents stated that SecOps practices are important, only 35% said it’s a completely or mostly established practice in their organizations, and 18% admitted that SecOps is not established at all.

So what’s the hold up to SecOps adoption? Typically, it’s a concern that security will slow down business.

In our latest playbook — SecOps Playbook for Cloud Infrastructure, Part II: A Practitioner’s Guide for Security & Ops Teams — we offer tips on how to systematically integrate security best practices into DevOps — without sacrificing speed or security.

Read more “New SecOps eBook for Cloud Infrastructure – A Practitioner’s Guide for Security & Ops Teams”

What’s In Our SecOps Stack: 6 Top Integrations

When it comes to creating a solid SecOps program, an organization must consider people, processes, and technology. It’s not one area that makes a secure program, but a combination of all three working together.

As good as our people are, however, they would not get far without systematic processes backed by powerful tools and integrations. Here at Threat Stack, we use the following tools to ensure that our organization is safe, secure, and operating effectively. Read more “What’s In Our SecOps Stack: 6 Top Integrations”

Why DevOps Needs Security During an Infrastructure Transition

The rising popularity of DevOps practices in cloud infrastructure environments has allowed software teams to release work more quickly and efficiently than ever before, but is security top of mind? Data included in a new Pathfinder Report from 451 Research would suggest not.

According to data included in “Refocusing Security Operations in the Cloud Era,” 36% of businesses said their top IT goal over the next year is to respond to business needs faster, while 24% said it is to cut costs. In comparison, only 10.5% prioritized improving security as their top goal, coming in dead last among the options listed.

The problem seems to stem from the misconception that speed and security are mutually exclusive, where DevOps views security as a business decelerator rather than the stabilizing force it is. Baking security into DevOps processes early on through SecOps best practices, which we’ll review below, is the only way to build long-term sustainable infrastructure that will support your products and team as they move into the future. Read more “Why DevOps Needs Security During an Infrastructure Transition”