Whose Fault is That? How NOT to Be a Cloud Security Statistic

Gartner predicts that 95% of cloud security failures from now until 2020 will be the customer’s fault. That means when something goes wrong, it’s probably not AWS or Azure’s fault. Chances are, you have to point the finger at your organization.

Or — better yet — you could take the necessary and proactive steps to minimize the likelihood that you’ll become one of the cloud security failures. The good news is that it’s pretty easy to find out what you need to do. Below we’ll outline the steps to make sure that you stay out of the headlines and out of the statistics. Read more “Whose Fault is That? How NOT to Be a Cloud Security Statistic”

The Real Implications of The Shared Security Model

Gone are the days when the majority of businesses could point to the cloud warily and say, “I think my data’s safer on-prem.” Organizations today are far less worried about how secure the cloud is in general, and this change in attitude has sped up cloud adoption to a great degree.

What has led to this more relaxed embrace of the cloud? In part, providers like AWS have gone to great lengths to codify and transparently communicate a Shared Responsibility Model that has expressly defined the scope and boundaries of responsibility. Increasingly, customers recognize that Amazon and its brethren have all-star teams that have a security focus ingrained in them. There’s a certain level of comfort that comes with knowing you are in good, experienced hands.

But, even as the cloud is proven to be quite secure and as confidence in it increases, Security and DevOps teams still have to be vigilant about their own workloads. Organizations have to pick up their end of the shared responsibility bargain — and in some cases, even take it a step further than what is required.

With that in mind, here’s what today’s organizations need to know in order to do that successfully and continue to benefit from all that the cloud has to offer without major security concerns stymying progress. Read more “The Real Implications of The Shared Security Model”

Small Details, Big Impact: Improving Configuration Auditing

The Product Team at Threat Stack is always on the lookout for ways — big and small — that we can make the Threat Stack experience smoother and easier for our users. Recently we rolled out a small UI change that makes a big difference in helping you triage your AWS Configuration Auditing results.

Since we released AWS Configuration Auditing at the end of last year, we’ve had a great response to the feature from new and existing customers alike. But as the feedback rolled in, one theme caught our attention: At a glance, users were taking a while to discern where their focus was most needed — in other words, which violations to remediate first. We wanted to learn more. Read more “Small Details, Big Impact: Improving Configuration Auditing”

How Securely Configured is Your AWS Environment?

This post offers valuable tips on how to easily assess how well your AWS environment is configured using Configuration Auditing. So, let’s get started…

What is a Cloud Security Baseline?

The phrase is bandied about a lot, so let’s get to it: What is a security baseline?

One of the problems that many organizations run into, especially when they are starting out in cloud security, is not knowing where to start and not having specific data to help them define and improve the status of their cloud security.

That’s where a baseline proves critical. CERN Computer Security defines a security baseline as “a set of basic security objectives which must be met by any given service or system.”

If you put this in the context of cloud security, a baseline will show you how closely a snapshot of your current cloud environment conforms to industry best practices and benchmarks.

This sounds a bit academic, so let’s get down to specifics by taking a look at Threat Stack Audit— the new product we are offering to help you establish and maintain a baseline. Read more “How Securely Configured is Your AWS Environment?”