How to Work Backwards to Develop a Sound Security Strategy

In today’s cloud-based environments, security threats can move faster and do more damage than ever before. To avoid a financial and technological repercussions, companies must be proactive with their security strategies and have the ability to act fast.

A common approach is to “over-secure” company systems, but this can unnecessarily limit employee access to important tools and hinder productivity. Alternatively, those who know security well realize that if you offer employees too much access, it can open your business to security vulnerabilities.

A better approach centers on striking the right balance between security and practicality, and the way companies can achieve this is by working backwards from the ideal security scenario to formulate their strategy.

In this post, we’ll explore ways that security leaders can approach technology in a manner that is both usable for employees but also secure for the company. To do this, they must begin with an analysis of the risks and the needs of their employees. Let’s dive in. Read more “How to Work Backwards to Develop a Sound Security Strategy”

New eBook: Myth Busting Intrusion Detection

Your Guide to Intrusion Detection for Modern Infrastructure

Many organizations that need cloud security are laboring behind a cloud of myths — unable to clearly define their requirements and match them to technology solutions and best practices that will enable them to operate securely at speed and scale in the cloud. Our new eBook — Myth Busting Intrusion Detection — is designed to clarify these issues. Read more “New eBook: Myth Busting Intrusion Detection”

A Straightforward Workflow to Define Your Cloud Security Strategy

Security is a big concern for organizations of pretty much every size and shape. Once you have organization-wide agreement that security is a priority (for most companies today, this is a no-brainer), it’s time to get to work.

So where do you start? Of course, you’ll need an individual or an interdisciplinary group to lead your security initiatives, but beyond that, it’s a matter of focusing on the right things at the right time to get your security program up and running as quickly and as smoothly as possible. Getting it done right should always be an objective, and getting it done quickly is also highly desirable — especially if you have a legal or customer requirement to become more secure.

In our latest webinar, “Automating Security and Compliance for Your Cloud Deployment,” Chris Gervais, Threat Stack’s VP of Engineering, and Katie Paugh, G2 Technology Group’s Security Architect discussed a simple workflow that every company can follow to successfully implement an effective security plan. Watch the full recording or read the main points below. Read more “A Straightforward Workflow to Define Your Cloud Security Strategy”

5 Security Blogs Your CFO Needs to Read

5 Security Blogs Your CFO Needs to Read

Before I started working at Threat Stack, security was not always at the top of my priority list. Now, as the CFO of a leading cloud security company, I’ve learned to take a more holistic view of security: I still view it as a necessity that ensures the safety of an organization’s data and systems, of course, but I also understand that it can be a powerful business enabler and business driver.

Put another way, I no longer view security as just an expense (a “necessary evil”?), and see it as an investment that adds ongoing value throughout the organization and beyond as it not only provides foundational security, but also bolsters corporate reputation, adds confidence to customer relations, streamlines sales cycles, reassures board members and investors, helps with achieving compliance, and so on.

In spite of the huge value it adds, security can still be something of a hard sell — especially in companies where resources, including budget, are limited. With that in mind, I want to use this post to share some of the things I’ve learned as CFO at Threat Stack. Read more “5 Security Blogs Your CFO Needs to Read”

When It’s Time To Put An Engine In Your Cloud Security Lifeboat

Oftentimes companies wait until they grow to a certain size or have a full technology stack before they begin thinking seriously about security. The problem with this is that, statistically, it’s a matter of when you will have a security problem, not if.

So our observation is: If you wait until your company reaches some arbitrary milestone before implementing mature security practices, you may already be late to the game. (If you’ll pardon the obvious, it’s not a great practice to put your life jacket on after your boat gets in trouble; it’s much better to put it on at the very start — i.e., as soon as you board the boat.)

Security maturity actually has nothing to do with the size of your operations — and a great deal to do with how you manage the risk that is inherent in any environment. Even in the smallest companies, security can have a major impact. And we’re not just talking about implementing two-factor authentication or using VPNs (although these are, of course, important). We’re talking about the importance of starting to use a comprehensive approach to monitoring and protecting your infrastructure (on-prem, cloud, or hybrid) as early as possible.

The good news is, today you don’t need dozens of security tools or a major budget to start building end-to-end protection. But you do need to be smart about when and how you implement security. If you haven’t integrated security into your operations from Day 1, this post reviews four transformative events (planned or otherwise) that signal when it’s time to get serious about your organization’s cloud security maturity. Read more “When It’s Time To Put An Engine In Your Cloud Security Lifeboat”

How to Adapt Your Risk Management Strategy for the Cloud

Security has always been about accepting and managing risk. It’s not about becoming the most secure company; its goal is to protect against likely threats to your unique organization. But how do you know when a new risk crops up? And how can you stay on top of this in a rapidly changing cloud environment with more endpoints to monitor?

Fortunately, the cloud doesn’t just introduce new risks. It also offers new opportunities for successful risk management. And while managing risk in the cloud may seem overwhelming, it can actually become a lot more streamlined if you do it right. In this post, we’ll explain how risk management is different in the cloud and how you can adapt with a few simple shifts to your current approach. Read more “How to Adapt Your Risk Management Strategy for the Cloud”

5 Cloud Security Tips for Emerging Tech Companies

True or false: Companies born in the cloud naturally understand security.

Young and tech-savvy companies running in the cloud often deal with the same cloud security issues as larger organizations that are moving to the cloud from legacy or on-prem solutions. In fact, the unique requirements of tech companies — like continuous development cycles and cutting-edge, rapidly evolving processes — can sometimes add even more complexity to security. If you fall into this camp, you may find this blog useful. In it, we’ve rounded up some of our best advice so you can learn how to strengthen your cloud security posture and start building out a cloud security strategy starting now, without a big drain on your budget and resources. Read more “5 Cloud Security Tips for Emerging Tech Companies”

The Three Pillars of Continuous Security Improvement

Security should never be a one-and-done proposition: It requires a continuous improvement mindset to keep you on top of security initiatives and to accommodate new issues as you detect them. Once your security program is up and running, you need to measure, evaluate, and modify it on an ongoing basis to maintain or improve your results. This doesn’t necessarily require a ton of time and effort; it simply requires a strategy.

So today, we want to take a look at what it takes to build an effective security program with continuous improvement at its core. In our view, there are three key pillars to continuous security improvement, and if you have been following along with our Starting Your Cloud Security Journey blog post series, then you’ll be well-acquainted with these concepts. Read more “The Three Pillars of Continuous Security Improvement”

How to Answer Your Board’s Tough Security Questions

Picture the scene: You’re at the monthly board of directors meeting when someone asks, “So, what are you guys doing about security?”

Even two years ago, a CSA survey found that security was a board-level concern at 61% of companies.  Why?

High-profile breaches have certainly made everyone conscious of cyber security issues, and as awareness and knowledge have grown, boards have begun to take a direct interest in the security of the companies they have invested in. Given that there are very real monetary and reputational consequences to a security breach,  board members want to know what steps you are taking to prevent one. Read more “How to Answer Your Board’s Tough Security Questions”

Don’t Make Perfect Security the Enemy of Good Security

We’ve written before about what it means to meet compliance standards without going completely overboard. Today, we want to talk about how that applies to cloud security as well. Some teams mistakenly believe that their security posture needs to be absolutely perfect. That’s not only overwhelming — it’s impossible.

More to the point, the reality of today’s security landscape is that cybercriminals are always looking for the path of least resistance. If company A has reasonably good security safeguards in place and company B does not, criminals aren’t going to waste resources poking at company A until they find a weakness. They’ll go after company B.

This is why we tell organizations that, when it comes to security, perfect can often be the enemy of good. Rather than trying to make your organization perfectly airtight, it’s time to focus on making your company as unappealing an attack target as possible. Here’s how. Read more “Don’t Make Perfect Security the Enemy of Good Security”