Stretching Left With Threat Stack Application Security Monitoring

Developers have always been overworked. They face a constant flow of feature-focused work from the business and need to balance that with work involving performance, quality and reliability, and technical debt. While DevOps and highly automated CI/CD pipelines have made developers more productive by removing low-value non-development tasks, it has actually made the pressure to deliver even greater. According to the 2018 DORA Accelerate: State of DevOps report, high-performing DevOps teams have 46X more frequent code deploys than low-performing teams. That’s a lot more work for developers — more high-impact work, happily, but more work nonetheless.  Read more “Stretching Left With Threat Stack Application Security Monitoring”

Tips for Choosing the Right CI/CD Tools

Building an effective CI/CD pipeline can be a complex process with countless decisions that require a great deal of planning. Whether it’s a massive DevOps team or a single developer working alone, the more you can draw on practical, real-world knowledge in making decisions about CI/CD tools the better off you are. While highly experienced developers can pass along tips to less experienced team members, the constantly changing nature of DevOps means that even the most experienced developer can benefit. 

Like all workflows, CI/CD workflows are susceptible to security concerns, so it’s a best practice to integrate security into your DevOps world (something commonly known as DevSecOps). By pairing leading continuous integration tools with a cloud security and compliance solution like the Threat Stack Cloud Security Platform®, you can build security directly into the entire software development lifecycle. With security across the CI/CD pipeline, you can ensure that your team is developing more reliable and secure applications, without compromising your team’s efficiency.

In this post, we offer 50 tips offered up by a variety of industry experts as a good place for software engineers to start building a knowledge base. To make things easier, we’ve divided the list into the following categories, beginning with a few general tips that are useful no matter the team or project: Read more “Tips for Choosing the Right CI/CD Tools”

Defining the “Full Stack” in Full Stack Security Observability

Here at Threat Stack, we’ve been talking a lot about security observability recently (check out this article and whitepaper). When you design and monitor your systems for security observability, you reduce risk and minimize the likelihood and potential impact of a security breach.

But in the same way that you’d never invest in locks and alarms for the windows of your house while leaving the doors wide open, you can’t protect your business by focusing security observability on a single perimeter only. Security observability delivers value when it’s applied throughout the entire system. We call this Full Stack Security Observability. But what, exactly, is the “full stack?” Read more “Defining the “Full Stack” in Full Stack Security Observability”

How to Defend Against ZombieLoad

Earlier this week a group of security researchers from Graz University of Technology, imec-DistriNet, KU Leuven, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and Cyberus Technology identified and analyzed a vulnerability in Intel chips being called ZombieLoad (CVE-2018-12130) that allows sensitive data to be stolen from the processor. You can get all the details on ZombieLoad directly from the researchers here. Thankfully, researchers do not believe this exploit has been used in a real-life attack. Read more “How to Defend Against ZombieLoad”

A Threat Stack SOC Analysis: The Continuing Evolution of the Shellbot Cryptomining Malware

Update: Threat Stack Presents Threat Briefing
On New Cryptomining Shellbot Malware Variant

Available: On demand

About This Threat Briefing

Recently, Threat Stack’s Security Operations Center (SOC) uncovered a variation of the Shellbot malware in a public cloud environment. In this active cryptojacking campaign, the sophisticated malware features several layers of obfuscation and continues to be updated with new functionality after it has gained a foothold in an infected environment.

In this briefing, Threat Stack SOC Analyst Ethan Hansen walks through the details of the newly discovered cryptojacking campaign, including the malware components, actual observed attack path, and the future investigations.

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Download Threat Stack’s Inside a Docker Cryptojacking Exploit

Threat Stack’s Security Operations Center (SOC) recently discovered an ongoing and evolving malware campaign that leverages a new variant of the Shellbot malware discovered by JASK in November 2018 and published in February 2019. (You can read their full report here.)

In this new variant of the campaign, Threat Stack has identified the addition of a new SSH brute force tool, a secondary command and control method, and the added ability to stop other cryptominers on infected servers. Read more “A Threat Stack SOC Analysis: The Continuing Evolution of the Shellbot Cryptomining Malware”

Cloud Security Observability: How to Reduce Risk in Your Cloud-Native Infrastructure

Security Observability has become an important concept recently as companies have started building software with a cloud-native mindset, embracing distributed, immutable, and ephemeral systems. As infrastructure has shifted from traditional deployment methods, older monitoring systems are no longer effective, and a new set of practices — called “observability” — has emerged.

In this post, we explain what observability is, why security observability important, and outline six principles that will help you design and monitor your systems for security observability. (For an in-depth discussion, download our new whitepaper: Cloud Security Observability: A Guide to Reducing Your Cloud Native Infrastructure Risk.) Read more “Cloud Security Observability: How to Reduce Risk in Your Cloud-Native Infrastructure”

Beyond Checkboxes: 6 Cloud Security Measures All Healthcare Organizations Should Take

Modern healthcare is a full participant in the digital economy, and personal health information (PHI) is at its center. But today’s digital landscape is a volatile threat environment where sensitive personal data is a coveted commodity. Minimizing exposure, liability, and risk to PHI is a necessity with visibility all the way up to the board-level in every healthcare organization.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) includes the HIPAA Privacy Rule which establishes national standards to protect PHI. Every organization conducting health care transactions electronically is familiar with its rules, and being “HIPAA Compliant” is mandatory. But such standards can create a false sense of security; is simply checking the boxes and satisfying an annual audit really enough to keep attackers at bay? Do standards written over the course of decades adequately cover today’s rapidly evolving threat landscape? Are processes developed in the days of enterprise data-centers sufficient to protect containerized microservices running in the cloud?

The short answer is No: Merely being compliant is no longer enough. Digital leaders in proactive healthcare organizations — from providers to insurance companies — have realized that they must do much more to protect themselves from threats. Embracing DevSecOps and CI/CD gives healthcare organizations a strong foundation for security that goes beyond compliance with true full stack security observability. Read more “Beyond Checkboxes: 6 Cloud Security Measures All Healthcare Organizations Should Take”

7 Cloud Service Evaluation Criteria to Help You Choose the Right Cloud Service Provider

The lack of a common framework for assessing Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) combined with the fact that no two CSPs are the same can complicate the process of selecting one that’s right for your organization. Selecting CSPs becomes even more complex when you consider the fact that more and more companies are adopting a multi-cloud approach for a variety of reasons, including cost savings, reduced risk of vendor lock-in, and data portability. (Gartner estimates that 75% of organizations will be using a multi-cloud strategy by 2022.) Add in the adoption of abstraction technologies such as containers, and workloads become for more portable between CSPs. To help you work through this, we’re using this post to discuss seven basic criteria you can use to identify providers that best match your business, technical, and operational needs.

How do you choose a public cloud provider — or if you’re planning to go multi-cloud — cloud providers? Let’s start with the major players. Read more “7 Cloud Service Evaluation Criteria to Help You Choose the Right Cloud Service Provider”

How to Achieve Full Stack, Multi-Cloud Security Observability

You probably know AWS as the leading cloud platform provider. These days, however, many companies are using additional cloud providers as well. According to Gartner’s October 2018 report “Market Insight: Multicloud Becomes Essential for Cloud IaaS Offerings,” 49% of organizations were approaching their cloud computing IaaS strategy through multi-cloud adoption in 2017, and that is expected to increase to 75% by 2022. Most often they’re not trading one for another, but are choosing multiple providers for a variety of reasons: Different business requirements (such as managing risk and costs) may be better suited to different cloud vendors. Many vendors are likewise pricing their offerings competitively and continually adding new features.

If you’ve decided to run a multi-cloud environment as part of your organization’s security strategy, you need to make sure you’re taking appropriate security precautions. This may be a challenge, so in this post, we’ll cover five principles to follow when you make the move to multi-cloud. Read more “How to Achieve Full Stack, Multi-Cloud Security Observability”